Oct 11
From Classroom to Community: Implementing Experiential Learning for Career Development

​Webinar Series: Sponsored by RRC’s Program and Curriculum Development department and presented by the Canadian Association of Career Educators and Employers (CACEE).

Wednesdays, ​​​October 18 and October 25, 2017

RRC’s Program and Curriculum Development department invites you to attend two webinars on experiential learning.  At RRC, community engagement service learning is defined as “a teaching and learning strategy that integrates meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich learning experiences, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.”

Community engagement has been part of RRC’s programs for many decades and allows our students to meaningfully explore their discipline, develop critical soft skills and confidence, and prepare for successful careers beyond the classroom.

Learning through doing takes many forms at RRC but all focus on integrating active engagement and learning through real-world settings. 

Webinar 1: Navigating Promises and Pitfalls of Experiential Learning in Post-Secondary Education

Presented by Dr. Rob Shea, Memorial University​

Date: ​Wednesday, October 18, 11:00 pm – 12:00 pm
Place: DM13K Board Room
Registration: Employee Development Registration​ 

This session will assist the participant to understand the theory behind experiential learning and the opportunities for present and future practice.

The webinar will explore experiential learning and how to: 

  • ​infuse curriculum with career-integrated learning competencies through experiential learning practice
  • engage students in reflecting on the importance of experiential learning in their career development journey
  • assess the impact of work-integrated learning on student retention, student recruitment, and educational success.

robert-shea.png Dr Robert Shea is a faculty member in the Faculty of Education at Memorial University. His area of research and teaching has embraced career development, experiential learning, higher education leadership and university administration. His university service includes leadership roles as president of four national associations and multiple senior leadership roles as Dean, Deputy Provost and currently Associate Vice-President Academic and Student Services. 

Webinar 2: Exploring the Potential to Gain “Power Skills” Through Volunteer Experiences

Presented by Kristine Vanderplas, Youth Challenge International, and Fabienne Pierre-Jacques, Canada World Youth

​Date: Wednesday, October 25, 11:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Place: DM13K Board Room​
Registration: Employee Development Registration​ 


​At RRC, communication, teamwork, collaboration, adaptability, conflict resolution, problem solving, and critical thinking are called College Wide Learning Outcomes and are essential for people entering today’s employment market. One of the most effective ways to acquire these skill is through experiential learning. 

This webinar will explore the link between power skills and experiential learning. You will also learn to distinguish between different volunteering models and gain a better understanding of volunteering as an opportunity for personal and professional development.

Kristine Vanderplas.png​​​Kristine Vanderplas has worked with young people in various capacities for over 20 years. Kristine currently works with Youth Challenge International as the Director of Program Development, where she continues to explore the potential and capacity of young people to innovate and co-create employment solutions.

 

Fabienne Pierre-Jacques.pngFabienne​ Pierre-Jacques’ position at Canada World Youth allows her to combine a strong track record supporting youth engagement and a commitment to community-led development. Though of Haitian origin, she grew up in Montreal and holds a degree in Sociology from McGill University.

Sep 15
Creating a Lifebook; Revealing Hidden Gifts

In the Disability and Community Support program, Tara Mullen instructs the “Community Membership & Disability” course, where students learn to facilitate and su​pport the meaningful inclusion of individuals with disabilities in the community. As a major portion of this course, students create a “Lifebook” with a person who lives with an intellectual disability.


3.pngThe Life Book includes photos, captions, magazine pictures, quotes, colours and other things that make the book a creative and useful representation of the person.  

Lifebooks may take many forms. Normally a scrapbook is created, however as Tara points out, scrapbooking skills are not essential and storytelling skills are far more important. Other than scrapbooks, students have also produced videos and graphic novels.

The subject of the Lifebook could be a person the student knows from practicum or work, or they could be a family friend, or even a relative or a sibling. The common denominator is the person is someone who, because of their disability, has been left out of the typical experiences that come with being part of society. Through being marginalized, their gifts to society remain hidden. The Lifebook captures a holistic view of the individual, in order to affirm and develop their self-concept as a person beyond the identifier of “disability” or “client”.  It can even be used as a way for new caregivers to learn about him/her as a person with preferences, uniqueness, and an identity.

2.pngTara described a student from Chile, where disabilities are viewed primarily from a medical perspective, who has a friend with a daughter who lives with an intellectual and physical disability.  Through Skype and email, the student successfully assembled a Lifebook on behalf of the teenage girl.  The Lifebook has opened up a narrative as to who she really is, and people around her now have a chance to focus on the gifts she has to share. The girl’s mother shared information about the Lifebook with other parents in her support group. They too are interested in creating a Lifebook for their sons and daughters who live with disabilities.

We’d like to commend Tara Mullen and the entire Disability and Community Support program for telling us about this fascinating and worthy CESL project. Thanks for sharing!

Questions and Answers from Tara Mullen

  • How long has this project run?  
    This project has been running for more than ten years.

  • What are the students intended to get out of this experience?
    The student gains experience in getting to know a person as a unique individual with abilities, aspirations and history.  This counteracts the common experience of focusing primarily on the person’s disability. In this course, students are guided to learn how to assist a person with a disability to connect with others in their community.  As citizens, we do this primarily through our strengths and interests. We make contributions and spend time with other community members who share common interests.  This project leads students to help a person with a disability find places where they can increase their connections to community through their abilities and interests. 

  • What have you learned from this project?
    Each Lifebook is as unique as the person it represents.  As an instructor, my role is to guide each student to find the best way to create the Lifebook for that specific person. The more control I give to the student and the person at the center of the Lifebook, the more creativity is expressed.

  • Is there anything you change about this project? Is there a lesson learned you can share?
    This type of project is quite different from the traditional ways students have been asked to demonstrate their knowledge.  While some students jump at the chance to be creative and work on unique assignments, others may not feel as confident or prepared.  I show examples of completed Lifebooks, to give students a visual sense of how it could look, and we talk about the goals this project can achieve.  This helps students develop a vision and plan for their project to unfold.

  • How do the students know if they’ve met the project goal(s)?
    Students know if they’ve accomplished the project goals by considering how much they have learned about the person. When a student learns about a person’s history, interests and abilities, they start to feel a connection to the person and often find areas of commonality.  Through the process of gathering information with the person, the student has an opportunity to compile what they have learned in a way that can be shared with others so that more people will come to know the person in a holistic way.  Lifebooks are very compelling and engaging.  If a student has met the goals, you can feel it in the contents of the book.  I have also created an assignment outline that includes an overview of the information that is contained in a well-developed Lifebook.  Marks are assigned to specific content areas to add objectivity to what would otherwise be a very subjective assessment.

  • How do you wrap the project up?
    Students write a reflection about their experience after completing the Lifebook.  I find they are very candid in describing what went well, what they would do differently and what they learned about themselves and the person they worked with.  When the student presents the person with their finished Lifebook, they usually spend time together, reviewing the work they collaborated on. The Lifebooks are a source of pride and accomplishment for the person at the center of the book and it often becomes an important resource to share with family, support staff and others in the community.

If you have any further questions about this project, you may contact Tara Mullen (tmullen@rrc.ca) in the Disability and Community Support Program at Red River College.

May 11
Red Forum 2017 - Do you know what your students are learning at work?
​How do you ensure your students are learning on their work placements outside the walls of RRC?

 Learning in the community has been part of RRC’s mandate of “applied education” for decades, regardless of what it is called in each program. However, up to now, these valuable workplace learning activities have not have been articulated by consistent definitions, standards, and processes across RRC programs and schools.

If your program currently offers students opportunities to learn while working for a business, industry, or community organization, you are involved in Community Engagement Service Learning. Join us to see how this initiative supports students as they develop skills and competencies needed in the real world. 

Friday May 12, 2017 2:45pm - 3:45pm 
eTV Studio B (Downstairs)



May 24
Red Forum Wrap-up – Community Engagement Service Learning Roundtable

In a Red Forum day session, held on Friday May 13th, several members of the college community were on hand to share their CESL (Community Engagement Service Learning) related activities at Red River College.  

After a brief overview of community-engaged learning at RRC, attendees rotated through the presenters' tables to hear about student community projects.  Nearly every participant had the opportunity to engage the presenters, some exploring the methods of adding a community-engaged learning compone​nt to their own program.

red-forum1.jpgDan Greenberg - Business Information Technology - Industry Projects -Students complete technical projects for organizations and businesses.


red-forum6.jpgMarianne Cerilli - Community Development/ Community Economic Development.  Students help coordinate, staff and analyze a Community Development conference.


red-forum5.jpgGabriela Ludusan - Mentorship Program Coordinator – Intercultural Student Mentorship & Step Out Of Your Box Programs.


red-forum4.jpg

Mavis Lewis-Webber - Early Childhood Education - ECE practicum students assist at Fort Whyte Nature School.​


red-forum3.jpg

Darren Blaine Stebeleski - Graphic Design Advanced Certificate - Pro Bono Graphic Design project for a community group 


If you have a success story about Community Engagement Service Learning in your program or course, please tell us about it by completing the information form here .​

Or please contact Craig Edwards, PCD Curriculum Consultant and Community Engagement Service Learning Team Leader at cedwards@rrc.ca

Also, check out the CESL web site for more details about Community Engagement Service Learning at RRC. http://air.rrc.ca/CESL/


May 06
Outside The Walls: Students Working And Learning In The Community
Graphic-Two-Box-2-1.png​On Red Forum day, join us as we explore CESL (Community Engagement Service Learning) related activities at Red River College. 
​​

​W​​h​​en: 12:3​0-2:00 pm. Friday 13 May 2016 ​​​

Where: In the (newly renovated!) Community Services Lab AB13 (just north of the old Hard Drive Café)

After a brief overview of community-engaged learning at RRC, attendees will rotate through the presenters' tables to hear about student community projects, and will have the opportunity to engage in three to four discussions. This session is the perfect opportunity to explore adding a community-engaged learning component to your program.

We are proud to announce the following Instructors and their Community Learning projects:

  • Darren Blaine Stebeleski - Graphic Design Advanced Certificate - Pro Bono Graphic Design project for a community group.  (Check out Darren's work in a previous blog post!​)
  • Marianne Cerilli - Community Development/ Community Economic Development.  Students help coordinate, staff, analyze a Community Development conference.
  • Gabriela Ludusan - Mentorship Program Coordinator - International Student Mentorship & Step Out Of Your Box Program.
  • Mavis Lewis-Webber - Early Childhood Education - ECE practicum students assist at Fort Whyte Nature School.
  • Dan Greenberg - Business Information Technology - Industry Projects -Students complete technical projects for organizations and businesses.
  • Wilf McPherson – Aboriginal Carpentry Program - Carpentry students, as part of the Indigenous Leadership Development Institute, are building change rooms for the new RRC Sweat Lodge site.​

Each Instructor will  discuss their particular CESL initiative:

  • How did they determine the project and community partner for their course or program?
  • How did they involve the community partner in determining the focus and outcomes of the project?
  • How did the students contribute to the community?
  • How did they assist their students to reflect on and analyze what they had learned from the project?

Join us on Red Forum day. Be prepared for a session jam-packed with valuable expertise and experience!

For more information about CESL, visit air.rrc.ca/CESL or contactCraig Edwards: cedwards@rrc.ca

Apr 08
Graphic Design Advanced Diploma Program Project

Community Engagement Service Learning supports College-Wide Learning Outcomes, especially “Contribute to Community”: Red River College graduates engage responsibly, respectfully, and ethically in their communities. They value the interdependence of social justice, sound economics, and meaningful environmental practices. They embrace global perspectives and lifelong learning.

Darren Stebeleski.jpg​​​Led by instructor and graphic designer Darren Blaine Stebeleski (MDES, BFA [Hons]), the experiential component of the Graphic Design Advanced Diploma — a Community Design Project — asks students in the program to seek out a non-profit client working in an area of interest or social concern to the student and build, not only a relationship, but a tangible graphic design needed by the client. The student must first approach the client through "cold-calling," arrange an initial meeting, then go through the exercise of creating a Project Briefing Agreement with the client through an interview process. From the Brief, the student is expected to isolate the most suitable graphic design project the client has need of at the present time.

The concept is then worked to the prototype stage, pitched/presented to the client, any changes or rework made, sign-off obtained from the client, and the project implemented. Examples of implementation include: printing a brochure or poster; if it's a website, it must go live; if it is a logo, the student delivers the Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) file format to the client.

Community Service or Need Addressed

The Community Design Project combines academic coursework with non-paid service in the community to address authentic community needs.  Students collaborate with all stakeholders — faculty, other students, and community organizations — in the design, planning, implementation, and follow-up on each project, employing critical thinking, reflection, communication, problem-solving, and teamwork skills.  Through this method of community engaged learning, students gain valuable real world design experience by working with and meeting the expectations of clients. Students provide a valuable service to members of the community in need of well-designed material, without the budget to afford it.  ​

Although students engaged in this project do not receive remuneration for their work they do receive credit towards their final marks in this program.

To learn more about the Graphic Design Advanced Diploma Program, check out the program's website at http://me.rrc.mb.ca/catalogue/CourseDescriptions.aspx?ProgCode=GRAAF-AD&RegionCode=WPG


 

Mar 17
Faculty Development Opportunity for Community Engaged Learning

Are you interested in faculty development focused on Community Engaged Learning?  

Red River College is a member of The Canadian Alliance for Community Service Learning (CACSL) and they are hosting their biannual conference in Calgary May 25 - 27th, 2016. RRC's Community Engagement Service Learning (CESL) Team wants you to get involved.

The Canadian Alliance for Community Service Learning (CACSL) provides leadership to strengthen and promote community service learning in Canada by supporting and connecting practitioners and community capacity-builders.

Mount Royal University, in Calgary, is pleased to host the 2016 national conference. The conference theme is "Impact for Sustainability" and the conference is structured to facilitate discussions, discovery, and networking among those who teach and coordinate student learning in the community.

As part of the conference, Volunteer Canada is hosting a series of three workshops. This series will bring academic faculty, Volunteer Centres, and community partners together to discuss and develop more collaborative working relationships. The Creating a Culture of Collaboration series was designed in response to feedback received from the previous conference, to provide more opportunities for academic and non-profit participants to interact and learn from each other.​

Creating a Culture of Collaboration series

Session 1: Creating the Potential
This session will set the scene for open dialogue and productive networking between Faculty and Volunteer Centres. Attendees will become more familiar with the wide range of work and varied activities of each group in order to see the potential in working together to positively impact communities.

​Session 2: Culture of Experience
In this session, examples of brokering models for Community-Campus engagement will be shared by participants. These case studies will be used to provide insight into the experiences of working relationships between post-secondary institutions and Volunteer Centres.

​Session 3: Collaboration Leads to New Opportunities
This session is an opportunity to dialogue and network. Participants will be encouraged to explore common goals and identify new ways of working together, long after the conference wraps-up.

​Please see the conference registration process at the following link http://cacslconference2016.ca/

Please contact Craig Edwards, PCD Curriculum Consultant and Community Engagement Service Learning Team Leader at cedwards@rrc.ca

Also, check out the CESL web site for more details about Community Engagement Service Learning at RRC. http://air.rrc.ca/CESL/

Feb 25
Have you heard about The Canadian Alliance for Community Service Learning (CACSL)?

​Red River College is a member of CACSL and they are hosting a Conference in Calgary May 25 - 27th, 2016. RRC's Community Engagement Service Learning (CESL) Team wants you to get involved.

The Canadian Alliance for Community Service Learning (CACSL) provides leadership to strengthen and promote community service learning in Canada by supporting and connecting practitioners and community capacity-builders.

Mount Royal University, in Calgary, is pleased to host the 2016 national conference. The conference theme is "Impact for Sustainability" and the conference is structured to facilitate discussions, discovery, and networking among those who teach and conduct research regarding Community Service Learning.​

One of the speakers is Patti H. Clayton, an independent consultant with over 15 years of experience as a practitioner, scholar, and educational developer in community-campus engagement and experiential education. More details http://cacslconference2016.ca/speakers/

Patti will be presenting 3 sessions –

TransCanada International Forum on Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

  • ​Session I (Wed, May 25 9:00 – 12:00): Integrating Critical Reflection and Assessment to Generate, Deepen, and Document Learning
  • Session II (Wed, May 25 1:30 – 4:00): Revisioning SoTL for Community Service-Learning / Community Engagement
  • Session III (Fri, May 27 9:00 – 11:30): Continuing our own SoTL Journeys: Questions, Collaborators, and Next Steps

Please see the registration process at the following link  http://cacslconference2016.ca/

Or please contact Craig Edwards, PCD Curriculum Consultant and Community Engagement Service Learning Team Leader at cedwards@rrc.ca

Also, check out the CESL web site for more details about Community Engagement Service Learning at RRC. http://air.rrc.ca/CESL/

 

Feb 18
Faculty Roundtable Sessions on Community Engagement Service Learning (CESL)

Are you interested in sharing experiences, expertise, lessons learned, and resources with other like-minded instructors?

Please join us on Tuesday, February 23 from 10-11:30 in W411 at the Roblin Campus for a roundtable discussion with RRC faculty involved in various types of community engagement service learning activities in their programs.

We will open the roundtable discussion with a brief presentation on community engaged learning at RRC and then move into sharing details of your projects/assignments by answering the following focusing question:

How do you determine the learning outcomes and related assessments of your community projects?

To accommodate as many faculty as possible, please plan on approximately 10 minutes to explain your project by sharing details of your project purpose, partner, outcomes, logistics, and assignments.

This discussion will be of specific interest to faculty, curriculum developers, and instructional designers.  It will be facilitated by members of the Community Engagement Service Learning (CESL) Team.

Please see more details of the Community Engagement Service Learning definition at RRC http://air.rrc.ca/CESL/default.aspx

Related Sessions

Please check the CESL web site for more videos of past sessions available to you. http://air.rrc.ca/CESL/workshops.aspx.

More Information

For general inquiries, please contact

Craig Edwards B. Ed, M. Ed
Curriculum Consultant
Program & Curriculum Development
Centre for Teaching Excellence, Innovation & Research
cedwards@rrc.ca (204) 632-2575

Visit our AIR site: http://air.rrc.ca/pcd

 

Dec 04
CACSL Conference in Calgary - 26-27 May 2016

cropped-banner2.png​​

Have you heard about The Canadian Alliance for Community Service Learning (CACSL)? They are hosting a Conference in Calgary on May 26 and 27th. ​

​​​CACSL helps students, educators, and communities build partnerships to learn from each other while working together to strengthen individuals, communities, and society. Red River College is a member of CACSL and TEIR's Community Engagement Service Learning Team wants you to get involved.  

Mount Royal University, in Calgary, is pleased to host the 2016 national conference on May 26 and 27, 2016. The CACSL conference theme is "Impact for Sustainability" and is being structured to facilitate discussions, discovery, and networking among those who teach and conducting research regarding Community Service Learning (CSL) and Community Engagement (CE).

There are 2 deadlines in January, 2016

  1. Call for Proposals
    Please submit your proposal to online through the conference website by January 15, 2016,​ January 31, 2016  (deadline extended) using the required template at the link below.

  2. Call for Student Stories
    As part of the conference MRU will publish a soft-cover publication, portions of which will also be available digitally through the Canadian CACSL website highlighting 50 student CSL projects from Canadian colleges and universities. The deadline is January 31, 2016.

Please see the detailed application process at the following link:  http://cacslconference2016.ca/

Or please contact Craig Edwards, PCD Curriculum Consultant and Community Engagement Service Learning Team Leader at  cedwards@rrc.ca

Also, check out the CESL web site for more details about Community Engagement Service Learning at RRC. http://air.rrc.ca/CESL/


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 The CESL Initiative

About this blog
The vision for the CESL initiative is to coordinate planning, promotion, design, development, and delivery of curriculum to enhance the success of RRC students, faculty, and staff in a wide range of community engagement service learning projects. The initiative is an integral part of the renewed College-Wide Learning Outcomes and will support the implementation of all six CWLO, especially “Contribute to Community”.