Nov 08
What Could I Do With This?

Since I became an Instructor, I often consider how I can use everyday items in the classroom.

  • A deck of cards? Perhaps a fun way to get students into groups?
  • My daughters' Halloween smarties? A tasty way to teach sampling?
  • My daughters' game HeadBanz? An effective way to review terms?

Ikea Spinner.JPGSo, when I noticed this spinner at IKEA, I knew I could use it in the classroom too. I used it as part of an ice breaker this fall. I wrote 24 unique questions and then numbered them. As students entered they were invited to spin the wheel to receive their question. This gave them a little time to think about their answer before class officially began.

I know there's more I could do with it for teaching. Any ideas? Or, anything from your world that you've repurposed for teaching?

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P.S. Let me know if you'd like to borrow it for your class!

Comments

Gamification in the classro...

Gamification in the classroom goes beyond the digital world of "badging" and "leveling up".  Even the traditional board game presents opportunities for higher-level thinking.  I've played monopoly in the accounting classroom (no money, only journals and ledgers!), and we also had a crazy-fun (yet totally purposeful) "Financial ratios track and field challenge". If anyone is interesting in learning more about the pedagogy behind bringing board games in to the classroom, contact me at sderksen36@rrc.ca to sign up for the workshop on table top games in the classroom.  This is hosted by the Teacher Education staff at the Notre Dame campus on the evening of November 13. See today's staff news for a complete description of the workshop and further details.  We will extend the registration deadline until November 10th.  Oh, did I mention it was FREE!!?
Picture Placeholder: Shannon Derksen
  • Shannon Derksen
 on 11/8/2019 8:28 AM

Love the ice breaker idea, ...

Love the ice breaker idea, but going beyond ice breaker,  the questions could be based on a particular topic as a pre-knowledge check OR as a review of the topic.  A bit of formative eval in the classroom.  Could be done as teams or just individual answers with candy rewards. 

As for re-purposing: I have brought both Barbie and Spongebob dolls into the class room as body image examples when discussing body image and the "Fallacy of Perfection" that we often evaluate ourselves by.  FYI: Having Spongebob as your Image of perfection leads to a much more positive view of oneself :-)
Picture Placeholder: Cynthia Alles-Parasidis
  • Cynthia Alles-Parasidis
 on 11/8/2019 9:34 AM

That would be so fun to use...

That would be so fun to use in the classroom! I like how there are numbers on there too. In the ESL classroom, I might use the numbers to ask students to come up with X number of sentences using a new vocabulary word. I often incorporate English pleasure reading in class as well (there is research by linguist Stephen Krashen to support self-selected reading and literacy), and I might have a student spin the wheel to determine how long we would do pleasure reading that day.
Picture Placeholder: Sherry L Seymour
  • Sherry L Seymour
 on 11/8/2019 9:38 AM

I have repurposed my daught...

I have repurposed my daughter's mini karaoke machine for karaoke quizzes!  I find clips of lyrics that include particular grammatical voices or structure (or not) and play/sing them, or give students the option to sing them, as part of quizzes I've made in kahoot.  I take suggestions from students for songs/artists and try to find examples from those (and include some of my own choices).  Here is the link to the parallelism challenge quiz I've made: https://create.kahoot.it/share/parallelism-challenge/04107dbd-4d96-4812-9b0d-a499bec9171a
As for the spinner, I love it!  I've wanted to use a spinner in the classroom too, to randomly select questions, activities, or groups.  I can see it being fun to use for group activities, like one group picking interview questions to ask another group.  I might bug you to borrow it, Janine! 
Picture Placeholder: January E Luczak
  • January E Luczak
 on 11/8/2019 9:57 AM

I have repurposed my daught...

I have repurposed my daughter's mini karaoke machine for karaoke quizzes!  I find clips of lyrics that include particular grammatical voices or structure (or not) and play/sing them, or give students the option to sing them, as part of quizzes I've made in kahoot.  I take suggestions from students for songs/artists and try to find examples from those (and include some of my own choices).  Here is the link to the parallelism challenge quiz I've made: https://create.kahoot.it/share/parallelism-challenge/04107dbd-4d96-4812-9b0d-a499bec9171a
As for the spinner, I love it!  I've wanted to use a spinner in the classroom too, to randomly select questions, activities, or groups.  I can see it being fun to use for group activities, like one group picking interview questions to ask another group.  I might bug you to borrow it, Janine! 
Picture Placeholder: January E Luczak
  • January E Luczak
 on 11/8/2019 9:57 AM

Janine, the spinner idea is...

Janine, the spinner idea is phenomenal! I’m glad I’m not the only one that looks through an “instructor” filter everywhere I go. Just a heads up though, in case you want to do something similar but happen to leave your physical spinner at home, a random name generator (or number if you need it) at www.classtools.net allows you to do something similar online while enabling you to remove the name or the number chosen. I have mainly used the generator to randomly put people into groups, but you have just given me a new idea. Thank you.
Picture Placeholder: Ron Rogge
  • Ron Rogge
 on 11/8/2019 11:07 AM

Reading this post made my b...

Reading this post made my brain perk up!!!!

If you had a weighty topic, you could use the spinner to determine how many points the students need to come up with for a predetermined concept / topic for a review.  So if you divide the students into groups, each group gets a topic, then spins, and if they land on 24 - they have to think of 24 pieces of information about their topic mohahahahahhaaha :)
Picture Placeholder: Lindsay Mulholland
  • Lindsay Mulholland
 on 11/9/2019 5:03 PM

Also, just checked out www....

Also, just checked out www.classtools.net!  Ron, it is gold!  Thank you!
Picture Placeholder: Lindsay Mulholland
  • Lindsay Mulholland
 on 11/9/2019 5:06 PM

You could also do a “wheel ...

You could also do a “wheel of fortune” game for review.  In groups, students can take turns spinning the wheel, the number is the amount of points they will get if they answer the review question correctly.  The group with the most points at the end wins.
Picture Placeholder: Lindsay Mulholland
  • Lindsay Mulholland
 on 11/10/2019 3:23 PM